Breaking Down Exoplanet Stovepipes

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he search for life beyond our solar system requires unprecedented cooperation across scientific disciplines. NASA's NExSS collaboration includes those who study Earth as a life-bearing planet (lower right), those researching the diversity of solar system planets (left), and those on the new frontier, discovering worlds orbiting other stars in the galaxy (upper right). Credits: NASA
The search for life beyond our solar system requires unprecedented cooperation across scientific disciplines. NASA’s NExSS collaboration includes those who study Earth as a life-bearing planet (lower right), those researching the diversity of solar system planets (left), and those on the new frontier, discovering worlds orbiting other stars in the galaxy (upper right). (NASA)

That fields of science can benefit greatly from cross-fertilization with other disciplines is hardly a new idea.  We have, after all, long-standing formal disciplines such as biogeochemistry — a mash-up of many fields that has the potential to tell us more about the natural environment than any single approach.  Astrobiology in another field that inherently needs expertise and inputs from a myriad of disciplines, and the NASA Astrobiology Institute was founded (in 1998) to make sure that happened.

Until fairly recently, the world of exoplanet study was not especially interdisciplinary.  Astronomers and astrophysicists searched for distant planets and when they succeeded came away with some measures of planetary masses, their orbits, and sometimes their densities.  It was only in recent years, with the advent of a serious search for exoplanets with the potential to support life,  that it became apparent that chemists (astrochemists, that is), planetary and stellar scientists,  cloud specialists, geoscientists and more were needed at the table.

Universities were the first to create more wide-ranging exoplanet centers and studies, and by now there are a number of active sites here and abroad.  NASA formally weighed in one year ago with the creation of the Nexus for Exoplanet System Science (NExSS) — an initiative which brought together 17 university and research center teams with the goal of supercharging exoplanet studies, or at least to see if a formal, national network could produce otherwise unlikely collaborations and science.

That network is virtual, unpaid, and comes with no promises to the scientists.  Still, NASA leaders point to it as an important experiment, and some interesting collabortions, proposals and workshops have come out of it.

“A year is a very short time to judge an effort like this,” said Douglas Hudgins, program scientist for NASA’s Exoplanet Exploration Program, and one of the NASA people who helped NExSS come into being.

“Our attitude was to pull together a group of people, do our best to give them tool to work well together, let them have some time to get to know each other, and see what happens.  One year down the road, though, I think NExSS is developing and good ideas are coming out of it.”

Illustration of what a sunset might look like on a moon orbiting Kepler 47c and its two suns. (Softpedia)
Illustration of what a sunset might look like on a moon orbiting Kepler 47c and its two suns. (Softpedia)

 

One collaboration resulted in a “White Paper” on how laboratory work today can prepare researchers to better understand future exoplanet measurements coming from new generation missions. Led by NExSS member Jonathan Fortney of the University of Clalfornia, Santa Cruz, it was the result of discussions at the first NExSS meeting in Washington, and was expanded by others from the broader community.

Another NExSS collaboration between Steven Desch of Arizona State University and Jason Wright of Penn State led to a proposal to NASA to study a planet being pulled apart by the gravitational force a white dwarf star.  The interior of the disintegrating planet could potentially be analyzed as its parts scatter.

Leaders of NExSS say that other collaborations and proposals are in the works but are not ready for public discussion yet.

In addition, NExSS — along with the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) — sponsored an unusual workshop this winter at Arizona State University focused on a novel way to looking at whether an exoplanet might support life.  Astrophysicists and geoscientists (some paertr of NExSS teams; some not) spent three days discussing and debating how the field might gather and use information about the formation, evolution and insides of exoplanets to determine whether they might be habitable.

One participant was Shawn Domogal-Goldman, a research space scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center and a leader of the NExSS group.  He’s an expert in ancient earth as well the astrophysics of exoplanets, and his view is that the Earth provides 4.5 billion years of physical, chemical, climatic and biological dynamics  that need to be mined for useful insights about exoplanets.

When the workshop was over he said: “For me, and I think for others, we’ll look back at this meeting years from now and say to ourselves, ‘We were there at the beginning of something big.”

NExSS has two more workshops coming up, one on “Biosignatures” July 27 t0 29 in Seattle and another on stellar-exoplanet interactions in November.  Reflecting the broad reach of NExSS, the biosignatures program has additional sponsors include the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI), NASA’s Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP), and international partners, including the European Astrobiology Network Association (EANA) and Japan’s Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI).

SA (2001) By looking for signs of life like we have on earth, we focus on trying to find the presence of oxygen, ozone, water, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide; indicating plant or bacterial life. Looking at the figure above, we can see how complex Earth’s spectra is compared to Mars or Venus. This is because of various factors that balance and control the elements needed for life as a whole. In the same way, we’re hoping to find life that strongly interacts with its atmosphere on a global scale.
By looking for signs of life, scientists focus on the potential presence of oxygen, ozone, water, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, which could indicate plant or bacterial life. The figure above shows how complex Earth’s spectra is compared to Mars or Venus. This is a reflection of the intricate balance and control of elements needed to support life. The upcoming NExSS workshop will focus on what we know, and need to know, about what future missions and observations should be looking for in terms of exoplanet biosignatures. (ESA)

The initial idea for NExSS came from Mary Voytek, senior scientist for astrobiology in NASA’s Planetary Sciences Division.  Interdisciplinary collaboration and solutions are baked into the DNA of astrobiology, so it is not surprising that an interdisciplinary approach to exoplanets would come from that direction.  In addition, as the study of exoplanets increasingly becomes a search for possible life or biosignatures on those planets, it falls very much into the realm of astrobiology.

Mary Voytek, NASA senior scientist for astrobiology, xxxx.
Mary Voytek, NASA senior scientist for astrobiology, who initially proposed the idea that became the NExSS initiative.

Hudgins said that while this dynamic is well understood at NASA headquarters, the structure of the agency does not necessarily reflect the convergence.  Exoplanet studies are funded through the Division of Astrophysics while astrobiology is in the Planetary Sciences Division.

NExSS is a beginning effort to bring the overlapping fields closer together within the agency,  and more may be on the way.  Said Hudgins:  “We could very well see some evolution in how NASA approaches the problem, with more bridges between astrobiology and exoplanets.”

NExSS is led by Natalie Batalha of NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California; Dawn Gelino with NExScI, the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena; and Anthony Del Genio of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City.

All three see NExSS as an experiment and work in progress, with some promising accomplishments already.  And some clear challenges.

NASA's NExSS initiative seeks to bring together scientists from varied backgrounds to address questions of exoplanet research. The initiative consists of 17 teams that had applied for NASA grants under a variety of different programs, but organizers are looking to bring other scientists into the process as well. (NASA)
NASA’s NExSS initiative seeks to bring together scientists from varied backgrounds to address questions of exoplanet research. The initiative consists of 17 teams that had applied for NASA grants under a variety of different programs, but organizers are looking to bring other scientists into the process as well. (NASA)

 

Del Genio, for instance, described the complex dynamics involved in having a team like his own — climate modelers who have spent years understanding the workings of our planet — determine how their expertise can be useful in better understanding exoplanets.

These are some of his thoughts:

“This sounds great, but in practice it is very difficult to do for a number of reasons.  First, all the disciplines speak different languages. Jargon from one field has to be learned by people in another field, and unlike when I travel to Europe with a Berlitz phrase book, there is no Earth-to-Astrophysics translation guide to consult.

Tony del Genio, a veteran research scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in Manhattan.
Tony Del Genio, a veteran research scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in Manhattan.

“Second, we don’t appreciate what the important questions are in each others’ fields, what the limitations of each field are, etc.  We have been trying to address these roadblocks in the first year by having roughly monthly webinars where different people present research that their team is doing.  But there are 17 teams, so this takes a while to do, and we are only part way through having all the teams present.

“Third, NExSS is a combination of teams that proposed to different NASA programs for funding, and we are a combination of big and small teams.  We are also a combination of teams in areas whose science is more mature, and teams in areas whose science is not yet very mature (and maybe if you asked all of us you’d get 10 different opinions on whose science is mature and whose isn’t).

What’s more, he wrote, he sees an inevitable imbalance between the astrophysics teams — which have been thinking about exoplanets for a long time — and teams from other disciplines that have mature models and theories for their own work but are now applying those tools to think about exoplanets for the first time.

But he sees these issues as challenges rather than show-stoppers, and expects to see important — and unpredictable — progress during the three-year life of the initiative.

Natalie Batalie said that she became involved with NExSS because “I wanted to help expedite the search for life on exoplanets.”

Natalie Batalha, project scientist for the Kepler mission and a leader of the NExSS initiative.
Natalie Batalha, project scientist for the Kepler mission and a leader of the NExSS initiative.

“Reaching this goal requires interdisciplinary thinking that’s been difficult to achieve given the divisional boundaries within NASA’s science mission directorate.  NExSS is an experiment to see if cooperation between the divisions can lead to cross-fertilization of ideas and a deeper understanding of planetary habitability.”

She said that in the last year, scientists working on planetary habitability both inside and outside of NExSS — and funded by different science divisions within NASA — have had numerous NExSS-sponsored opportunities to interact, learn from each other and begin collaborations.

The Fortney et al “White Paper” on experimental data gaps, for example, was conceived during one of these gatherings, as was the need for a biosignatures analysis group to support NASA’s Science & Technology Definition Teams studying the possible flagship missions of the future.

Dawn Gelino sees NExSS as an opportunity to speed the pace of addressing and answering open questions in the exoplanet field.  “As a community, we’re making progress towards answering some of them faster than others,” she wrote to me.

 Dawn Gelino, NExScI Science Affairs senior scientist and a leader of the NExSS initiative.
Dawn Gelino, NExScI Science Affairs senior scientist and a leader of the NExSS initiative.

“NExSS gives us an opportunity to look at all of these questions from many points of view.  Suddenly, a problem that a team of researchers has been stuck on has the potential to be solved quickly by learning from those in other disciplines who have dealt with similar problems. ”

Gelino said that NExSS is also working with various NASA study and analysis groups, the teams that come together to take on complicated questions and can later guide and sometimes define some of the science of a NASA mission. The discussion and conclusions from the upcoming Seattle biosignatures workshop, for instance, will be taken up by NASA’s Exoplanet Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG).

As a result, Gelino said, “NExSS scientists can share the knowledge gained from their interactions with earth scientists, heliophysicists, and planetary scientists, which broadens the knowledge of the community as a whole.”

In full disclosure, Many Worlds is funded by NExSS but represents only the views of the writer.

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Storming the One-Meter-Per-Second Barrier

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Kitt Peak National Observatory mountain top at Dusk looking north. Visible in the picture are the NOAO 4-meter Mayall, the Steward Observatory 90-inch, the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory Spacewatch Telescopes, LOTIS, 0.4-meter Visitor Center Telescope, Case Western Reserve University Observatory and the SARA Observatory. Credit: P. Marenfeld (NOAO/AURA/NSF)
The Kitt Peak National Observatory, on the Tohono O’odham reservation outside Tucson, will be home to a next-generation spectrometer and related system which will allow astronomers to detect much smaller exoplanets through the radial velocity method.  P. Marenfeld (NOAO/AURA/NSF)

When the first exoplanet was identified via the radial velocity method, the Swiss team was able to detect a wobble in the star 51 Pegasi at a rate of 50 meters per second.   The wobble is the star’s movement back and forth caused by the gravitational pull of the planet, and in that first case it was dramatic — the effects of a giant Jupiter-sized planet orbiting extremely close to the star.

Many of the early exoplanet discoveries were of similarly large planets close to their host stars, but it wasn’t because there are so many of them in the cosmos.  Rather, it was a function of the capabilities of the spectrographs and other instruments used to view the star.  They were pioneering breakthroughs, but they didn’t have the precision needed to measure wobbles other than the large, dramatic ones caused by a close-in, huge planet.

That was the mid 1990s, and radial velocity astronomers have worked tirelessly since to “beat down” that 50 meters per second number.  And twenty years later, RV astronomers using far more precise instruments and more refined techniques have succeeded substantially:  1 meter per second of wobble is now achieved for the quietest stars.  That has vastly improved their ability to find smaller exoplanets further from their stars and is a major achievement.  But it has nonetheless been a major frustration for astronomers because to detect terrestrial exoplanets in the Earth-sized range, they have to get much more precise  — in the range of tens of centimeters per second.

A number of efforts to build systems that can get that low are underway, most notably the ESPRESSO spectrograph scheduled to begin work on the High Accuracy Radial Vlocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) in Chile next year. Then earlier this month an ambitious NASA-National Science Foundation project was awarded to Penn State University to join the race.  The next-generation spectrograph is scheduled to be finished in 2019 and installed at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, and its stated goal is to reach the 20 to 30 centimeters per second range.

Suvrath Mahadevan, an assistant professor at Penn State, is principal investigator for the project.  It is called NEID, which means ‘to see’ in the language of the Tohono O’odham, on whose land the Kitt Peak observatory is located.

“For many reasons, the (radial velocity) community has been desperate for an instrument that would allow for detections of smaller planets, and ones in habitable zones,” he said.  “We’re confident that the instrument we’re building will — in time — provide that capability.”

Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network.
A illustration of how the radial velocity method of planet hunting works.  The wobble of the stars is far away miniscule in galactic terms, making extreme precision essential in measuring the movement. (Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network)

Project scientist Jason Wright, associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, put it this way:  “NEID will be more stable than any existing spectrograph, allowing astronomers around the world to make the precise measurements of the motions of nearby, Sun-like stars.”  He said his Penn State team will use the instrument “to discover and measure the orbits of rocky planets at the right distances from their stars to host liquid water on their surfaces.”

NASA and the NSF wanted the new spectrograph built on an aggressive timetable to meet major coming opportunities and needs, Mahadevan said.

The speedy three-year finish date is a function of the role that radial velocity detection plays in exoplanet research.  While many planets have been, and will be, first detected through the technique, it is also essential in the confirming of candidate planets identified by NASA space telescopes such as Kepler, the soon-to-be launched TESS (the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) and others into the future.  There is a huge backlog of planets to be confirmed, and many more expected in the relatively near future.

What’s more, as Mahadevan explained, an instrument like NEID could significantly help NASA’s planning for a possible 2030s Flagship space telescope mission focused on exoplanets.  Two of the four NASA contenders under study are in that category — LUVOIR (Large Ultraviolet Visible Infrared) Surveyor and Hab-Ex — and their capabilities, technologies, timetables and cost are all now under consideration.

If NEID can identify some clearly Earth-sized planets in habitable zones, he said, then the planning for LUVOIR or Hab-Ex could be more focused (and the proposal potentially less costly.)  This is because the observatory could be designed to look at a limited number of exoplanets and their host stars, rather than scanning the skies for a clearly Earth-like planet.

“Right now we have no definite Earth-sized planets in a habitable zone, so a LUVOIR or Hab_ex design would have to include a blind search.  But if we know of maybe 15 planets we’re pretty sure are in their habitable zones, the targets get more limited and the project becomes a lot cheaper.”

Suvrath Mahadevan, assistant professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State, and principal investigator for a new-generation high precision spectrometer. (Penn State)
Suvrath Mahadevan, assistant professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State, and principal investigator for a new-generation high precision spectrometer. (Penn State)

These possibilities, however, are for the future.  Now, Mahadevan said, the Penn State team has to build a re-considered spectrograph, a significant advance on what has come before.  With its track record of approaching their work through interdisciplinary collaboration, the Penn State team will be joined by collaborators from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Colorado, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Macquarie University in Australia, Australian Astronomical Observatory, and Physical Research Laboratory in India.  Much of the work will be done over the next three years at Penn State, but some at the partner institutions as well.

Key to their assembly approach is that the instrument will be put together in vacuum-sealed environment and will have no vibrating or moving parts.  This design stability will prevent, or minimize, instrument-based misreadings of the very distant starlight being analyzed.

A major issue confronting radial velocity astronomers is that light from stars can fluctuate for many reasons other than a nearby planet — from sunspots, storms, and other magnetic phenomena.  The NEID instrument will try to minimize these stellar disruptors by providing the broadest wavelength coverage so far in an exoplanet spectrograph, Mahadevan said, collecting light from well into the blue range of the spectrum to almost the end of the red.

“We’re not really building a spectorograph but a radial velocity system, he said.  That includes upgrades to the telescope port, the data pipeline and more.

This is how Lori Allen, Associate Director for Kitt Peak, described that new “system”: “The extreme precision (of NEID) results from numerous design factors including the extreme stability of the spectrometer environment, image stabilization at the telescope, innovative fiber optic design, as well as state-of-the-art calibration and data reduction techniques”.

 

The new generation spectrograph will be installed on the 3.5 meter WYN telescope at Kitt Peak. Operated by National Optical Astronomy Observatory, the $10 million project is a collaboration of NASA and the National Science Foundation.
The new generation spectrograph will be installed on the 3.5 meter WYN telescope at Kitt Peak. The site is managed by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and $10 million spectrograph project is a collaboration of NASA and the National Science Foundation.

Sixteen teams ultimately competed to build the spectrograph, and the final two contenders were Penn State and MIT.  Mahadevan said that, in addition to its spectrograph design, he believed several factors helped the Penn State proposal prevail.

His team has worked for several years on another advanced spectrograph for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope in Texas, one that required complex vacuum-sealed and very cold temperature construction.  Although the challenges slowed the design, the team ultimately succeeded in demonstrating the environmental stability in the lab.  So Penn State had a track record. What’s more, the school and its Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds have a history of working in an interdisciplinary manner, and have been part of several NASA Astrobiology Institute projects. (The instrument has a blog of its own: NEID.)

The Kitt Peak observatory, which saw first light in 1994, has been the sight of many discoveries, but in recent years has faced cutbacks in NSF funding.  There was some discussion of reducing its use, and the NASA-NSF decision t0 upgrade the spectrograph was in part an effort to make it highly relevant again.  And given the scientific need to confirm so many planets — a need that will grow substantially after TESS launches in 2017 or 2018 and begins sending back information on thousands of additional transiting exoplanets — enhancing the capabilities of the Kitt Peak 3.5 meter telescope made sense.

Kitt Peak is unusual in being open to all comers with a great proposal, whether they’re from the U.S. or abroad.  The Penn State team and partners will get a certain number of dedicated night to observe, but many others will be allocated through competitive reviews.  And so when NEID is completed, astronomers from around will have a shot at using this state-of-the-art planet finder.

 

 

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Hunting for Exoplanets Via TESS

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The TESS satellite, which will launch in 2017, will use four cameras to search for exoplanets around bright nearby stars. MIT
The TESS satellite, which will launch in 2017, will use four cameras to search for exoplanets around bright nearby stars. MIT initially proposed the mission, and it was approved in 2013.  (MIT)

Seven years ago this month the Kepler spacecraft launched into space – the first NASA mission dedicated to searching for planets around distant stars. The goal was to conduct a census of these exoplanets, to learn whether planets are common or rare. And in particular, to understand whether planets like Earth are common or rare.

With the discovery and confirmation of over 1,000 exoplanets (and thousands more exoplanet candidates that have not yet been confirmed), Kepler has taught us that planets are indeed common, and scientists have been able to make new inferences about how planetary systems form and evolve. But the planets found by Kepler are almost exclusively around distant, faint stars, and the observations needed to further study and characterize these planets are challenging. Enter TESS.

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA Explorer mission designed to search for new exoplanets around bright, nearby stars. The method that TESS will use is identical to that used by Kepler – it looks for planets that transit in front of their host star. Imagine that you’re looking at a star, and that star has planets around it.

If the orbit of the planet is aligned correctly, then once per “year” of the planet (i.e. once per orbit), the planet will pass in front of the star. As the planet moves in front of the star, it blocks a small fraction of the light, so the star appears to get slightly fainter. As the planet moves out of transit, the star returns to normal brightness. We can see an example of this in our own solar system on May 9, 2016, as Mercury passes in front of the Sun.

Tranit
A small dip in the amount of light emanating from a star tells astronomers that a planet may well be crossing in front of it.

We can learn a lot from observing the transits of a planet. First, we can learn the size of a planet – the bigger the planet, the more light it will block, and the larger the “dip” in the brightness of the host star. Second, we can learn how long the planet’s year is – since it only passes in front of the star once per orbit, the time between transits is the planet’s year.

The duration of the year, in combination with the properties of the host star, also allows us to determine if a planet might be habitable. With high precision measurements, we can also infer much more about the orbit of the planet (e.g., the eccentricity of the orbit). And, in fact, in some cases, we can look at small changes in the apparent year of the planet to discover additional planets in the system that do not transit (Transit Timing Variations).

To observe these transits, TESS will use four identical, extremely precise cameras mounted behind four identical 8-inch telescopes. Each one of these cameras will be sensitive to changes in the brightness of a star as small as about 40 parts per million, allowing TESS to detect planets even smaller than our planet.

Earth, transiting the sun, would produce a dip of about 100 parts per million. Each of the four cameras has a field-of-view of 24°×24°, and the fields of the four cameras are adjacent so that TESS will instantaneously observe a 24°×96° swath of the sky (referred to as an observation sector). Within this field, TESS will collect “postage stamp” images of about 8,000 stars every two minutes – the postage stamps are small sub-images, nominally about 10×10 pixels.

Over the course of two years, TESS will survey nearly the entire sky looking for transiting exoplanets. Each observing sector covers a patch of sky 24°×96° for 27 days; where sectors overlap, TESS will be able to observe planets for a long as nearly a year.
Over the course of two years, TESS will survey nearly the entire sky looking for transiting exoplanets. Each observing sector covers a patch of sky 24°×96° for 27 days; where sectors overlap, TESS will be able to observe planets for a long as nearly a year. (Ricker et al)

TESS will stare continuously at each of these observation sectors for 27 days before moving to the next sector; over the course of one year, this will give TESS coverage of almost one entire hemisphere, with postage stamp data on approximately 100,000 stars. In the second year of the TESS mission, 13 additional sectors will cover the other hemisphere of the sky, resulting in observations of about 200,000 stars.

The method used for these postage stamp-sized observations is very similar to that used for Kepler, but the survey itself is different. While TESS is conducting an all-sky survey (about 40,000 square degrees), Kepler looked at only a relatively small patch of the sky (115 square degrees). But with a telescope seven times larger than those on TESS, Kepler was able to look much further away – TESS surveys stars within only about 200 light years, compared to 3,000 light years for Kepler.

This underscores the difference in the underlying philosophy of the two missions. The goal of Kepler was to understand the statistics of exoplanets, to conduct a census to understand the population as a whole.

Artist's rendering of a Jupiter-sized exoplanet and its host, a star slightly more massive than our sun. Image credit: ESO
Artist’s rendering of a Jupiter-sized exoplanet and its host, a star slightly more massive than our sun. Image credit: ESO

TESS, on the other hand, is about finding planets around bright, nearby stars –planets that will be well-suited to follow-up observations from both the ground and from space. On average, the stars observed by TESS will be between 30 and 100 times brighter than those observed by Kepler. These brighter targets will allow for follow-up observations that will be critical for understanding the nature of the newly discovered planets – more on that in a moment.

In raw numbers, what do we expect from TESS?

Former MIT graduate student Peter Sullivan conducted detailed simulations of the mission to make a prediction on what it might discover, and these results are incredible. With TESS, we expect to find over 1,600 new exoplanets within the postage stamp data, with about 70 of those being about the size of the Earth (within 25% of the Earth’s diameter), and almost 500 “super-Earth” planets (less than twice the diameter of Earth).

Perhaps most exciting is the likelihood that TESS will discover a handful of Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of their host stars.

Finding an Earth-sized planet in a distant habitable zone is a top goal of TESS, and of the exoplanet community as a whole. (NASA/Chester Harman)
Finding an Earth-sized planet in a distant habitable zone is a top goal of TESS, and of the exoplanet community as a whole. (NASA/Chester Harman)

In addition, while TESS obtains the postage stamp data every two minutes, it also obtains a full-frame image – a picture of the entire observing sector – every thirty minutes.

In those data, we expect to find over 20,000 additional planets. The majority of those will be large (Jupiter-size) planets, but there will also be about 1,400 additional super-Earths discovered. The sheer number of planets that will be found is amazing, but more important than the number is the fact that all of these planets will be orbiting bright, nearby stars. This is a fantastic leap relative to where we were just 25 years ago, when not a single exoplanet was known.

One of the challenges of transit measurements is that they can produce false positives. Stellar activity can cause quasi-periodic dips in the brightness of a star. An eclipsing binary star in the background could mimic the dip from a transiting planet. With careful analysis, most of these effects can be accounted for, but it remains important to follow a transit observation with a confirmation — making a secondary measurement to ensure that what was observed is, in fact, a planet.

The most straightforward way to confirm a transiting exoplanet is with a radial velocity (RV) measurement. The RV method takes advantage of the reflex motion of the star; as a planet orbits a star, the star itself doesn’t remain stationary. In fact, both the planet and the star orbit the center of mass of the system. So, if one looks at spectral lines from the host star, it is possible to measure the Doppler shift of those lines as the star does it’s little pirouette around the center of mass.

From this data, astronomers can measure the mass and the year (orbital period) of the exoplanet. This confirms the orbital period observed from the transit data, and the combination of radius (observed from the transit) and the mass (observed from the RV) gives us the bulk density of the planet. With that, we can make inferences about the composition of the planet – is it a rock, like Earth? A water-world or a ball of ice? A gas giant?

Measurements of the TESS space telescope. (NASA)
Measurements of the TESS space telescope. (NASA)

Making the RV measurement, while straightforward, is not an easy one – less than 10% of the exoplanet candidates found by Kepler have been confirmed with RV measurements, largely because the host stars themselves are faint. For TESS, however, because the host stars are nearby and bright, it will be possible to make follow-up observations on nearly all of the stars that host small planets – the only major limitation will be due to the noise from the stars themselves (i.e. flares, starspots).

Further, because these host stars are bright, they will also be excellent targets for transit spectroscopy. Imagine, for a moment, that there is a transiting planet with a very large atmosphere, and that this atmosphere is transparent in red and blue, but completely opaque in the green. Then, if you observe the planet in red light (or blue light), only the “rock” part of the planet will block light from the star. In green light, however, the rock and the atmosphere will both block light – in the green, the planet appears to be larger than at other wavelengths.

This is the core idea behind transit spectroscopy. By measuring how the apparent size of a transiting planet varies with wavelength, we can infer the composition (and potentially the structure) of the planetary atmosphere. This technique has been used successfully on a very small number of exoplanets to date, but with the large number of planets that TESS will find, and the fact that they will all be around bright, nearby stars, it will be possible to use the James Webb Space Telescope and the next generation of large ground-based telescopes to make these observations.

TESS is expected to add 2,000 new exoplanets to the already long list of the ones alrday detected. (NASA)
TESS is expected to monitor more than 200,000 stars and add 1,500 new exoplanets to the already long list of those confirmed or awaiting confirmation.  (NASA)

For the first time, astronomers will actually be able to study not only individual exoplanets, but will be able to study enough of them to make comparisons and draw conclusions about how planets form and evolve.

For me, TESS is endlessly exciting. The sheer quantity of new exoplanets is stunning. The ability to use follow-up observations to characterize these planets will create new paths for scientific investigation. And the discoveries made will help define the science that will be pursued by future missions such as WFIRST, and perhaps more ambitious missions in the future. But, perhaps most exciting, TESS is in part about making “Exoplanets for Everyone.”

In a few years, it will be possible for everyone to go outside to a dark location, point at a star that you can see with the naked eye, and say “there is a planet around that star.” And the night sky may never feel quite the same again.

Video link: TESS Trailer — https://youtube/ZsPStvGgNuk

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The Search for Exoplanet Life Goes Broad and Deep

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The scientific lessons learned over the centuries about the geological, chemical and later biological dynamics of Earth are beginning to enter the discussion of exoplanets, and especially which might be conducive to life. This is an artist's view of the young Earth under bombardment by asteroids, one of many periods with conditions likely to have parallels in other solar systems. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab)
The scientific lessons learned over the centuries about the geological, chemical and later biological dynamics of Earth are beginning to enter the discussion of exoplanets, and especially which might be conducive to life. This is an artist’s view of the young Earth under bombardment by asteroids, one of many periods with conditions likely to have parallels in other solar systems. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab)

I had the good fortune several years ago to spend many hours in meetings of the science teams for the Curiosity rover, listening in on discussions about what new results beamed back from Mars might mean about the planet’s formation, it’s early history, how it gained and lost an atmosphere, whether it was a place where live could begin and survive.  (A resounding ‘yes” to that last one.)

At the time, the lead of the science team was a geologist, Caltech’s John Grotzinger, and many people in the room had backgrounds in related fields like geochemistry and mineralogy, as well as climate modelers and specialists in atmospheres.  There were also planetary scientists, astrobiologists and space engineers, of course, but the geosciences loomed large, as they have for all Mars landing missions.

Until very recently, exoplanet research did not have much of that kind interdisciplinary reach, and certainly has not included many scientists who focus on the likes of vulcanism, plate tectonics and the effects of stars on planets.  Exoplanets has been largely the realm of astronomers and astrophysicists, with a sprinkling again of astrobiologists.

But as the field matures, as detecting exoplanets and inferring their orbits and size becomes an essential but by no means the sole focus of researchers, the range of scientific players in the room is starting to broaden.  It’s a process still in its early stages, but exoplanet breakthroughs already achieved, and the many more predicted for the future, are making it essential to bring in some new kinds of expertise.

A meeting reflecting and encouraging this reality was held last week at Arizona State University and brought together several dozen specialists in the geo-sciences with a similar number specializing in astronomy and exoplanet detection.  Sponsored by NASA’s Nexus for Exoplanet Systems Science (NExSS), NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) and the National Science Foundation,  it was a conscious effort to bring more scientists expert in the dynamics and evolution of our planet into the field of exoplanet study, while also introducing astronomers to the chemical and geological imperatives of the distant planets they are studying.

Twenty years after the detection of the first extra-solar planet around a star, the time seemed ripe for this coming together — especially if the organizing goal of the whole exoplanet endeavor is to search for signs of life beyond Earth.

 

Our vast body of knowledge about the formation, processes and evolution of Earth will become increasingly important in the exoplanet field as new generations of instruments make different and more precise kinds of measurements possible. Using Earth dynamics as a guide, those measurements will be made into models of what might be occurring on the exoplanets. The artist rendering of exoplanet Upsilon Andromedea g by Ron Howard.
Our vast body of knowledge about the formation, processes and evolution of Earth will become increasingly important in the exoplanet field as new generations of instruments make different and more precise kinds of measurements possible. Using Earth dynamics as a guide, those measurements will be made into models of what might be occurring on the exoplanets. The artist rendering of exoplanet Upsilon Andromedae g is by Ron Howard, Black Cat Studios.

Ariel Anbar, a biogeochemist at ASU, was one of the leaders of the meeting and the call for a broader exoplanet effort.

“The astronomical community has been pushing hard to make very difficult measurement, but they really haven’t been thinking much about the planetary context of what they’re finding.  And for geoscience, our people haven’t thought much about astronomical observations because they are so focused on Earth.”

“But this makes little sense because exoplanets open up a huge new field for geoscientists, and the astronomers absolutely need them to make the calls on what many of the measurements of the future actually mean.”

What’s more, the knowledge of researchers familiar with the dynamics of Earth will be essential when planet hunters and planet characterizers put together their wish lists for what kind of instruments are included in future telescopes and spectrographs.  For instance, a deep knowledge would be useful of the Earth’s carbon cycle, or what makes for a stable planetary climate, or what minerals and chemistry a habitable planet probably needs.

And then there are all the false positives and false negatives that could come with detections (or non-detections) of possible signatures of life.  The search for life beyond Earth has already had two highly-public and controversial seeming detections of extraterrestrial life — first by the Viking landers in the 1970s and the Mars meteorite ALH84001 in the mid 1990s.  The two are now considered inconclusive at best, and discredited at worst.

The risk of a similar, and even more complex, confusing and ultimately controversial, discovery of signs of life on an exoplanet are great.  The Arizona State workshop debated this issue at length.

President’s Professor at ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
Ariel Anbar, President’s Professor at ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration and School of Molecular Sciences. He hopes that the drive to understand exoplanets will push his field to develop a missing general theory for the evolution of Earth and Earth-like planets.

What they came away with was the understanding that while one or two measured biosignatures from a distant planet would be enormously exciting, a deeper understanding of the planet’s atmosphere, interior, chemical makeup and relationship to its host star are pretty much required to make a firm conclusion about biological vs non-biological origins.  (Here is a link to an introductory and cautionary tale to the workshop by another of its organizers, astrophysicist Steven Desch.)

And so the issues under debate were:  Does a planet need plate tectonics to be able to support life?  (Yes on Earth, perhaps elsewhere.) Would the detection of oxygen in an exoplanet atmosphere signify the presence of life? (Possibly, but not definitively.)  Does the chemical and mineral composition of a planet determine its ability to support life? (As far as we can tell, yes.)  Does photosynthesis inevitably lead to an oxygen atmosphere?  (It’s complicated.)

All these issues and many more serve to make the case that exoplanet science and Earth or planetary science need each other.

This is by no means an entirely new message — the Virtual Planetary Laboratory at the University of Washington has taken the approach for a decade from the standpoint of astronomy and the New Earths team of the NAI from a geological standing point.   But still, its urgency and proposed reach was  quite unusual.

It is also a reflection of both the success and direction of exoplanet science, because scientists have — or will have in the years ahead — the instruments and knowledge to learn more about an exoplanet than its location.  The James Webb Space Telescope is expected to provide much advanced ability to read the chemical compositions exoplanet atmospheres, as will a new generation of mammoth ground-based telescopes under construction and (scientists in the field fervently hope) a NASA flagship mission for the 2030s that would be able to directly image exoplanets with great precision.

But really, it’s when more and better measurements come in that the hard work begins.

Transmission spectrum of exoplanet MIT
Information about the make-up of exoplanets comes largely by studying the transmission spectra produced as the planet crosses in front of its star.  The spectra can identify some of the elements and compounds present around the exoplanet. Christine Naniloff/MIT, Julien De Wit.

 

Astrophysicist Steve Desch, for instance,  believes it is highly important to know what Earth-sized planets are like without life.  Starting with a biologically dead exoplanet in the Earth-sized ballpark, it would be possible to get a far better idea of the signatures of a similar planet with life.  But that’s a line of thinking that Earth scientists and geochemists are not, he said, used to addressing.  He felt the ASU workshop provided some consciousness-raising about the kinds of issues that are important to the exoplanet community, and to the Earth scientist, too.

Scientists from the geoscience side see similar limitations in the thinking of exoplanet astronomers.  Christy Till, a geologist and volcano specialist at ASU, said that at the close of the three-day workshop, she wasn’t at all sure that exoplanet scientists have been aware of just how complex the issue of “habitability” will be.

“Our field has learned over the decades that the solid interior of a planet is a big control on whether that planet can be habitable — along with the presence of volcanoes, the cycling elements like carbon and iron, and a relatively stable climate.  These issues were not widely discussed in terms of exoplanets, so I think we can help move the research further.”

Till is relatively new to thinking about exoplanets, brought into the field by the indisciplinary ASU (and NExSS/NAI) approach. But she said it has been most exciting to have the potential usefulness of her kind of knowledge expand on such a galactic scale.

Although the amount of detailed information about exoplanets is very limited, Till (and others) said what is and will be available can be used to create predictive models.  Absent the models that researchers can start building now, future information coming in could easily be misunderstood or simply missed.

ASU geologist and assistant professor Christy Till, a relatively new and enthusiastic member of the exoplanet community. (Abigail Wiebel)
ASU geologist and assistant professor Christy Till, a relatively new and enthusiastic member of the exoplanet community. (Abigail Wiebel)

While the usefulness of geosciences is being largely embraced in the exoplanet field, there are clear caveats.  If Earth becomes the model for what is needed for life in the cosmos, then is the field falling into a new version of the misguided Earth-centric view that long dominated astronomy and cosmology?

With that concern in mind, astronomer Drake Deming of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics made the case for collecting potential biosignatures of all kinds.  Since we don’t know how potential life on another planet might have formed, we also may well be unaware of what kind of signatures it would put out.  ASU geochemist Everett Shock was similarly wary of relying too heavily on the Earth model when trying to understand planets that may seem similar but are inevitably different.

And Ariel Anbar felt challenged by his more complete realization post-workshop that the exoplanets available to study for the foreseeable feature will not be Earth-sized, but will be “Super-Earths” with radii up to 1.5 times as great as that of our planet.  A proponent of much greater exoplanet-geoscience collaboration, he said the Earth science community has a big job ahead figuring out how the processes and dynamics understood on Earth would actually apply on these significantly larger relatives.

One participant at the workshop pretty much personifies the interdisciplinary bridge under construction , and he was encouraged by the extensive back-and-forth between the space scientists and the Earth scientists.

Shawn Domogal-Goldman, a research space scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center and a leader of the NExSS group, is an expert in ancient earth as well the astrophysics of exoplanet detection and characterizing.  His view is that the Earth provides 4.5 billion years of physical, chemical, climatic and biological dynamics  that need to be mined for useful insights about exoplanets.

“For me, and I think for others, we’ll look back at this meeting years from now and say to ourselves, ‘We were there at the beginning of something big.'”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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